Wed, Apr 20

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The Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater

MAHLER'S FOURTH - A Wicked New Look

A concert and post-performance discussion by PostClassical Ensemble. Mahler 4 presages the emergence of jazz: the music riffs on itself throughout, replacing “classical” repetition of themes with constant variation. PCE will premier an exciting new chamber version. Tickets are $45.00.

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MAHLER'S FOURTH - A Wicked New Look

Time & Location

Apr 20, 7:30 PM

The Kennedy Center's Terrace Theater, 2700 F St NW, Washington, DC 20566, USA

About the event

Mahler Fourth: A Wicked New Look

David Taylor, bass trombone

Madeleine Murnick, soprano

PostClassical Ensemble conducted by Angel Gil-Ordóñez

Produced by Joseph Horowitz

‍Program

Gustav Mahler: Funeral March (from Symphony No. 1)

      Arranged for chamber ensemble by Angel Gil-Ordóñez

Gustav Mahler: Wenn mein Schatz Hochzeit macht (from Songs of a Wayfarer) (1884-1885)

     Arranged for bass trombone and chamber ensemble by Angel Gil-Ordóñez

Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 4 (1899-1900)

     1.   Bedachtig, nicht eilen

     2.   In gemachlicher Bewegung, ohne Hast 

(recast by Joseph Horowitz and Angel Gil-Ordóñez as Mahlerei for bass      trombone and chamber ensemble)

Premiere performance

    3.  Ruhevoll, poco adagio

    4. Sehr behaglich

Arranged for chamber ensemble by Klaus Simon (2007)

Post-Concert Discussion

Mahler's Fourth: A Wicked New Look

Turn-of-the-century  Vienna was the epicenter of an artistic explosion that was cosmopolitan  and irreverent, mixing tradition with folk influences from across the  Austro-Hungarian empire. It was here that Mahler penned his Fourth  Symphony—not long after his fellow Bohemian Dvorak adapted African  American and Indian influences for his New World Symphony.

In  a sense, Mahler 4 presages the emergence of jazz: the music riffs on  itself throughout, replacing “classical” repetition of themes with  constant variation. It feeds upon folk and dance tunes and rollicks with  inner conflicts and contradictions, expressing Mahler’s own struggles  as an assimilated Jew in the Hapsburg capital that was both artistically  liberating and anti-Semitic.

PostClassical Ensemble  premieres a new chamber version that spotlights these influences center  stage. The symphony’s whirling scherzo becomes a concertino for bass  trombone—a wicked showcase for one of the world’s great  instrumentalists, David Taylor. Mahler wanted this solo to sound odd,  other-worldly, if not diabolical, directing the violin to tune up a  whole tone and to play roguishly. This style is squarely in Taylor’s  sweet spot and will be a performance unlike any other.

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